Comparison work with cross curricular dimensions

Hello All! I am preparing my year 8 to analyse and compare two poems. Obviously I want to go deeper in the analysis than the surface “they are both about school” I am planning to use a Venn diagram approach, taking elements of each poem and putting them into the diagram and using the overlap to identify rich areas for comaprison. How do other colleagues do this? Any tips from Historians as to how sources are comapred?

Thanks..

Posted by at March 1, 2013
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4 Responses to Comparison work with cross curricular dimensions

  1. Natalie Smith says:

    I usually use a BLAST structure (Both poems, Language, Attitudes, Structure, Themes).

    Could you give students a poem and a category to prepare, and turn it into a drama activity: ‘Good afternoon. My name is ‘The School Boy’ and the language I like to use is…’ Pupils could respond to this character which would turn into the reader reaction in their written responses.

  2. Natalie Smith says:

    I usually use a BLAST structure (Both poems, Language, Attitudes, Structure, Themes).

    Could you give students a poem and a category to prepare, and turn it into a drama activity: \’Good afternoon. My name is \’The School Boy\’ and the language I like to use is…\’ Pupils could respond to this character which would turn into the reader reaction in their written responses.

  3. Natalie Smith says:

    I usually use a BLAST structure (Both poems, Language, Attitudes, Structure, Themes).

    Could you give students a poem and a category to prepare, and turn it into a drama activity: \\\’Good afternoon. My name is \\\’The School Boy\\\’ and the language I like to use is…\\\’ Pupils could respond to this character which would turn into the reader reaction in their written responses.

  4. Brandon Hughes says:

    In History source comparisons we ask pupils to consider the tone, content, context and intended purpose of each piece of writing. Often I’ll have them make quick charts (or your Venn diagrams would seem to work well here) where they have to pull out examples from each source for the above mentioned categories. From there I ask them to construct their arguments as to how similar/different and it becomes a matter of simply pulling examples from their charts. Of course we also try to have them write a balanced answer, saving their analysis for their overall conclusion, but for some that’s a bridge too far. For the weaker pupils, being able to pull examples for each category is plus.

    Hope this helps in some way (and sorry it’s taken me so long to get on here)